C is for Chervil

The delicate, intense green leaves make chervil an attractive border plant.

The delicate, intense green leaves make chervil an attractive border plant.

This parsley relative is the main ingredient in Fines Herbs alongside parsley, chives, tarragon, and sometimes marjoram. Those who are familiar with French cooking should already know about this underrated-culinary herb. We use it almost exclusively in scrambled eggs and salads, although we’ll branch out this fall and add it proteins and roasted potatoes. The anise-taste diminishes  when dried, so it (along with the other Fines Herbs) should be used fresh.

Because chervil grows low to the ground, it is the perfect candidate to plant along a border with taller herbs behind it. If you’re not a chef, or not interested in kitchen herbs, chervil is still a must-have  for your garden.

Licorice flavor aside, chervil is lovely; It’s a wispier version of parsley. The plant, though liking full sun, appreciates cool feet making it a great companion plant with just about anything.

Pretty. Tasty. Easy-to-Grow. What’s not to like?

About master kindergardener

Santa Clara County Master Gardener since 2007, Mom since 2009, Gardener since birth.
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